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Simple Sentences, Stage 1

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Material

Paper analysis symbols – black arrows and red circles.
Teacher’s writing tray with long strips of paper.  

Presentation

Hunting the Subject: 1 Subject, 2 Actions 
  1. Invite two children to the lesson. 
  2. Bring the writing tray. 
  3. “I have a new activity for you both, I’m going to write sentences for you.” 
  4. On a paper slip, write the child’s name followed by two actions, ex: Nicholas coughed and sneezed. 
  5. Ask the child to read the sentence.  
  6. Ask the child to perform the action. “Can you do that?” 
  7. Ask the child to cut out the action words.  
  8. Bring the paper analysis symbols to the table. 
  9. “How many actions did you do? Two, that’s right!” 
  10. Place two red circles in a column on the right. 
  11. “What was the first action word? That’s right, coughed.” 
  12. Ask the child to put “coughed” on top of the first red circle.   
  13. “What was the second action word? That’s right, sneezed.” 
  14. Ask the child to put “sneezed” on top of the second red circle, which is below the other one. 
  15. “Who coughed? That’s right, Nicholas coughed.” 
  16. Place “Nicholas” on the left and place a black arrow next to the top red circle that points to the name. 
  17. “Who sneezed? That’s right, Nicholas sneezed.” 
  18. Place a black arrow next to the bottom red circle that points to the name. 
  19. Place “and” in the column in between the red circles.  
  20. Read the sentence in proper order by pointing to one word at a time. 
  21. Ask the child to transpose the actions. 
  22. “Does that make sense?  
  23. Repeat this process for each child a few times and include sentences that can and can’t be transposed.  
  24. Clean up and introduce the paper slips which have sentences on them and can be used for independent work. 
Hunting the Subject: 2 Subjects, 2 Actions 
  1. Repeat the same process from the previous exercise, but use two subjects and two actions.  
  2. For example, write “Dad rocked and baby slept.” 
  3. “Can you read that?” 
  4. “Can you act it out?” 
  5. “How many actions were there? That’s right, two!” 
  6. Ask the child to cut out the actions.  
  7. “What was the first action?”  
  8. Ask the child to place it on a red circle.  
  9. Ask the child to point the arrow towards the person who did it.  
  10. “What was the second action?” 
  11. Ask the child to place it on the red circle below the other one.  
  12. Ask the child to point the arrow towards the person who did it. 
  13. Place “and” in between the circles in the column.  
  14. What happens when we switch the actions?” 
  15. Read the new sentence.  
  16. “What happens when we switch the names?” 
  17. Read the new sentence.  
  18. Repeat this process a few times for each child.  
  19. Clean up and introduce the 2nd box of paper slips which have sentences on them and can be used for independent work. 
Hunting the Object: 1 Subject, 1 Action, 1 Object 
  1. Repeat the same process from the previous exercise, but use one subject, one action, and one object.  
  2. For example, write “Nicholas put on his coat.” 
  3. “Can you read that?” 
  4. “Can you act it out?” 
  5. “How many actions were there? That’s right, just one.” 
  6. Ask the child to cut out the action.  
  7. Ask the child to place it on a red circle. 
  8. “Who put on? Right, Nicholas did.” 
  9. Ask the child to point the arrow towards the name on the left.  
  10. “Nicholas put on the what? You got it, the coat!” 
  11. Place the arrow pointing to the right, followed by the object. 
  12. Transpose the subject, action and object. 
  13. Repeat this process a few times for each child.  
  14. Clean up and introduce the 3rd box of paper slips which have sentences on them and can be used for independent work. 
Hunting the Object: 1 Subject, 1 Action, 2 Objects 
  1.  Repeat the same process from the previous exercise, but use one subject, one action, and two objects.  
  2. For example, write “Nicholas wore a hat and a scarf.” 
  3. “Can you read that?” 
  4. “Can you act it out?” 
  5. “What was the action?” 
  6. “Can you cut out the action?” 
  7. Wait for the child to place the action on the red symbol.  
  8. “Who wore? That’s right, Nicholas.” 
  9. Wait for the child to place the arrow pointing to the name on the left. 
  10. “What were the objects? You got it! A hat and a scarf.” 
  11. “What was the first object?” 
  12. Place an arrow pointing to the right, slightly upward, followed by the first object. 
  13. “What was the second object?” 
  14. Place an arrow pointing to the right, slightly downward, followed by the second object. 
  15. Place “and” in between the two objects.  
  16. Ask the child to read it.  
  17. Ask the child to transpose.  
  18. Repeat the process with a few sentences for each child.  
  19. Clean up and introduce the 4th box of paper slips which have sentences on them and can be used for independent work. 
Hunting the Object: 2 Subjects, 2 Actions, 2 Objects 
  1. Repeat the same process from the previous exercise, but use two subjects, two actions, and two objects.  
  2. For example, write “Madhu weeded the garden and Nicholas raked the leaves.” 
  3. “Can you read that?” 
  4. “Can you act it out?” 
  5. Ask the child that is mentioned first to cut out her action and place the symbol. 
  6. Ask the same child what the subject was and wait for the child to place the arrow pointing to the left towards the child’s name.  
  7. Ask the same child what the object was and wait for the child to place the arrow pointing to the right towards the object.  
  8. Repeat this process for the child who was mentioned second.  
  9. Ask the children to transpose. 
  10. Clean up and introduce the 5th box of paper slips which have sentences on them and can be used for independent work. 
Hunting the Object: Pronoun as Object 
  1. Repeat the same process from the previous exercise but this time include an object that is a pronoun.  
  2. For example, write “The king gave a gift and the queen accepted it.” 
  3. “Can you read that?” 
  4. “Can you two act it out?” 
  5. “What was the action?” 
  6. Wait for the child to cut it out and symbolize it.  
  7. “Who gave?”  
  8. Wait for the child to place the word and arrow. 
  9. “That’s right, the King. The King gave what?” 
  10. Wait for the child to place the word and arrow. 
  11. Repeat this process for the other half of the sentence “and the queen accepted it.” 
  12. After the child places the arrow pointing to the right towards “it”, ask the child “What is it?” 
  13. “That’s right, it is the gift!” 
  14. Transpose.  
  15. Repeat this process a few times for each child.  
  16. Clean up and introduce the 6th box of paper slips which have sentences on them and can be used for independent work. 

Exercises

Hunting the Subject: 

1 Subject, 2 Actions
2 Subjects, 2 Actions 

Hunting the Object: 

1 Subject, 1 Action, 1 Object
1 Subject, 1 Action, 2 Objects 
2 Subjects, 2 Actions, 2 Objects
Pronoun as Object 

Purpose

To help the child understand the meaning of words in a sentence, and the position of words, so that he can read with better understanding.   
The child begins to talk and write more correctly by becoming more conscious of the change in meaning when the position of words are changed. 

Age

5

Notes

The child becomes aware that everything happens around the verb, the action is the pivot. 
Sequence of activities is important here, which can be introduced when the child is ready on another day. 
Word Study is also introduced around this time.   

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